Elizabeth Keserauskis

Building relationships and making connections

Hunger Strike to Challenge College Rankings

Continuing with the season of college rankings, here is an interesting story about a student embarking on a hunger strike to draw attention to the inadequacy of the U.S. News and World Report college rankings process. I don’t know about anyone else, but I think there are more important issues in the world about which we should go on a hunger strike.

Washington Monthly College RankingsWashington Monthly puts out an interesting college guide. They rate schools based on their contribution to the public good in three broad categories:

  • Social Mobility (recruiting and graduating low-income students)
  • Research (producing cutting-edge scholarship and PhDs)
  • Service (encouraging students to give something back to their country)

This certainly sounds like a much more worthwhile ranking system for prospective students and parents than the U.S. News rankings based on fame, exclusivity and money.

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September 7, 2010 Posted by | higher education, marketing, public relations | , , , , | Leave a comment

Would You Like to be Given a D+?

Drake D+ CampaignIs Drake University’s new ad campaign a bust, or successfully getting everyone talking about the school and its benefits to prospective students? It has been the center of significant attention on the web, including just a few I ran across recently:

If their marketing team’s purpose was to create something viral that everyone would talk about, mission accomplished. However, the fact that people are referring to the education you can get at Drake as a “D+” grade is probably not the image they were hoping for.

I also found it interesting that the marketing team did not even include their own staff and faculty in the testing of the new campaign. Your internal audience does not necessarily have to approve everything you do, but you can certainly create a sense of ownership and buy in if you involve them in the process where appropriate. By not including them, the marketing team had to backpedal and be on the defensive, explaining what the ad campaign was about in an internal email that of course someone posted online.

And what does this mean to the reputation of their advertising partner in the process, Stamats? Are they now branded as an agency that can create edgy advertising campaigns, or a team that didn’t include all stakeholders in the testing process or notice that ramifications of a “D+ Grade”?

In today’s communications climate, everyone is searching for the story or idea or campaign that is going to get everyone talking about their product/service/school. Was Drake successful? What do you think?

September 5, 2010 Posted by | engaging, higher education, marketing, reputation management | , , , , | Leave a comment